Englishespañol

A Guide To Caring For Yourself

What you should know about breast cancer, breast health, and breast cancer support (the short edition)

BREAST CANCER RISK

CHANCE OF DEVELOPING BREAST CANCER. THE BEST WAY TO MANAGE RISK IS TO LIVE A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE AND PRACTICE EARLY DETECTION.
FACTORS YOU CAN CONTROL
  • Being overweight or obese after menopause increases risk.
  • A healthy diet and exercise can lower risk.
  • Alcohol consumption increases risk.
  • Breastfeeding reduces risk, especially when done for longer than six months.
  • Hormone replacement therapy (a treatment that can reduce the effects of menopause) increases risk.
FACTORS YOU CAN’T CONTROL
  • Family history of breast cancer can increase risk.
  • About 5-10% of breast cancers are due to abnormal genes passed from parent to child.
  • A personal history of other cancer can increase risk.
  • Dense breasts are more likely to develop breast cancer (this is detected in a mammogram).
  • Women who started menstruation (periods) before the age of 12 are at higher risk.
  • Women who begin menopause after the age of 55 are at higher risk.
  • Women who have not had a full-term pregnancy or who had their first child after the age of 30 have a higher risk.
Having these risk factors doesn’t mean you will get breast cancer, nor does not having them mean you won’t! Talk to a medical professional about your breast health and about screening and early detection.

BREAST CANCER 101

Breast cancer is cancer that starts in the breast when cells begin to multiply out of control, typically (but not always!) resulting in a lump or mass. Most breast cancers start in the milk ducts or, less frequently, in the milk glands (called the lobules). Discovered at this point, when the cancer is still contained within the ducts or lobules, the cancer is designated stage 0. Once the cancer invades the breast tissue, the stages go up.

Breast cancer typically has no symptoms in its earliest stages, which is why screening is important for early detection. The most common physical sign is a painless lump. Sometimes breast cancer spreads to underarm lymph nodes and causes a lump or swelling. Less common signs include breast pain or heaviness; changes like swelling, thickening, dimpling, or redness of the skin; and nipple changes, including discharge, scaliness, or inversion. (If you notice any changes, be sure to see your doctor.)

Each breast cancer case is unique, and there is much more to know about this disease that affects 1 in every 8 women in the US. You can learn more about breast cancer online from the National Cancer Institute (cancer.gov), the American Cancer Society (cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer), or the Centers for Disease Control (cdc.gov/cancer/breast).

BREAST CANCER + YOU

ADVICE FOR SOMEONE NEWLY DIAGNOSED
  • Know that the diagnosis may be beyond your control, but how you respond is not.
  • Recognize that you are not responsible for this disease and let go of any regrets about things you could have done differently.
  • Find doctors you trust with your life – you are trusting them with your life! Learn and understand your treatment options; consider getting a second opinion if needed or for peace of mind.
  • Consider complementary therapies to heal your mind and spirit, such as yoga, aromatherapy, meditation, prayer, guided imagery, hypnotherapy, acupuncture, and massage.
  • Bring someone with you (in-person or virtually) to your appointments to take notes, be your second set of ears, and ask questions. Having company at your treatments is a good idea too.
  • Know that you don’t have to be strong for everybody else around you. Allow yourself to fully feel whatever emotions come along, whenever they come along.
  • Celebrate the successes along the way.
  • Try a support group with others who have been there before you are able to offer strength, advice, and encouragement.
If you have breast cancer, know that you are not alone! Get connected to other young women like you by emailing us at support@hereforthegirls.org
Here for the Girls (H4TG) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit improving the lives of young women affected by breast cancer (diagnosed under age 51). We offer social-emotional support through services that provide personal connections and a shared experience among our members. Our research-based support model focuses on the overall well-being of our members and delivers our services through a non-clinical, peer-based approach. The result is a robust, inclusive community based on equity and cultural humility that cultivates a sense of belonging and empowerment from diagnosis, through treatment, and beyond.

All these offerings are available at no cost to those we serve.

WHAT WE BELIEVE

Here for the Girls treasures “LOVE” above all and is committed to a culture that celebrates all people regardless of their ethnicity, race, color, abilities, religion, socioeconomic status, culture, and sexual orientation. We promote human rights for all through mutual respect and acceptance of differences without biases of any kind.

DO YOU HAVE BREAST CANCER?

social-emotional support | education | resources | activities
hereforthegirls.org or contact us at support@hereforthegirls.org
“Young women have so many different challenges, like careers and (many times) young families. Having a support group can help them navigate feelings, bounce questions off each other, and even laugh.” - H4TG Member
Email us at info@hereforthegirls.org
to get a full copy of A Guide to Caring for Yourself mailed to you!
MISSION: To improve the lives of young women affected by breast cancer

UNA GUÍA PARA CUIDARSE

Lo que debe saber sobre el cáncer de seno, la salud mamaria, y el apoyo para pacientes de cáncer de seno (edición breve)

LOS RIESGOS DE CÁNCER DE SENO

SI EVITA ESTOS RIESGOS PUEDE QUE BAJE LA PROBABILIDAD DE QUE SUFRA CÁNCER DE SENO. LA MEJOR MANERA DE DISMINUIR LOS RIESGOS ES VIVIR UNA VIDA SANA Y PRACTICAR LA DETECCIÓN TEMPRANA.
FACTORES QUE PUEDE CONTROLAR
  • Estar sobrepeso u obesa después de la menopausia aumenta el riesgo.
  • Una dieta sana y ejercicio pueden disminuir el riesgo.
  • El consumo de alcohol aumenta el riesgo.
  • Amamantar disminuye el riesgo, sobre todo cuando se hace por más de seis meses.
  • Terapia de reemplazo hormonal (un tratamiento que puede disminuir los efectos de la menopausia) aumenta el riesgo.
FACTORES QUE NO PUEDE CONTROLAR
  • Una historia clínica familiar de cáncer de seno puede aumentar el riesgo.
  • Alrededor del 5 a 10% de los cánceres de seno son causados por genes anormales heredados de padre/madre.
  • Una historia clínica personal de otro cáncer puede aumentar el riesgo.
  • Es más probable que los senos densos desarrollen cáncer de seno (esto se detecta mediante una mamografía).
  • Las mujeres que empezaron a menstruar (la regla) antes de los 12 años padecen de un riesgo más alto.
  • Las mujeres para quienes la menopausia comienza después de los 55 años padecen de un riesgo más alto.
  • Las mujeres que no han completado un embarazo o las que dieron a luz por primera vez después de los 30 años padecen de un riesgo más alto.
La presencia de estos factores no implica que va a padecer del cáncer de seno, de igual manera: la ausencia de estos factores no significa que no va a padecer del cáncer de seno. Hable con un médico sobre la salud mamaria, y sobre la detección temprana y los chequeos.

Cáncer de seno ABC

El cáncer de seno es un cáncer que empieza en el seno cuando algunas células empiezan a multiplicarse descontroladamente, lo que típicamente (pero no siempre) resulta en bulto o un nudo. La mayoría de los cánceres de seno empiezan en los conductos mamarios o, menos común, en los lobulillos glandulares. Si es descubierto en esta fase, cuando el cáncer todavía está contenido en los conductos o los lóbulos, el cáncer permanece en etapa 0. Una vez que invade el tejido del seno, se aceleran las etapas.

Típicamente, el cáncer de seno no muestra síntomas durante sus etapas tempranas, por lo que los chequeos son importantes para la detección temprana. El síntoma más común es un bulto que no hace daño. A veces el cáncer de seno se propaga hacia los nódulos linfáticos de las axilas, lo que causa un bulto o inflamación. Algunos síntomas menos comunes incluyen el daño mamario o un sentido de pesadez en el seno, cambios como inflamación, senos que se espesan, formación de hoyuelos en la piel, piel roja; y cambios del pezón como secreciones que no sea leche, piel seca o descamada, o inversión. (Si nota algún cambio, hable con un doctor.)

Cada caso de cáncer de seno es único y hay mucho más que aprender sobre esta enfermedad que llega a afectar 1 de cada 8 mujeres en Estados Unidos. Puede aprender más sobre el cáncer de seno en línea a través del Instituto Nacional de Cáncer (cancer.gov/espanol), la Sociedad Americana Contra el Cáncer (cancer.org/es/), o los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (cdc.gov/spanish/cancer/breast/).

CÁNCER DE SENO Y USTED

CONSEJOS PARA ALGUIEN RECIÉN DIGNOSTICADA
  • Sepa que tal vez el diagnóstico está fuera de su control, pero la manera en que responde, no.
  • Reconozca que usted no es responsable de padecer de esta enfermedad, y deje de pensar en lo que podría haber hecho de otra manera.
  • Busque médicos en los que puede confiar. Aprenda y entienda sus opciones de tratamiento; considere buscar una segunda opinión si lo necesita o para estar más tranquila.
  • Considere terapias complementarias para sanar su mente y su alma, como el yoga, la aromaterapia, la meditación, la oración, la visualización guiada, la hipnoterapia, la acupuntura, y el masaje.
  • Vaya a sus citas (en persona o virtuales) con alguien que pueda tomar apuntes, escuchar al médico, y hacerle preguntas. También es buena idea estar acompañada durante sus tratamientos.
  • Sepa que no necesita fingir fortaleza para ser considerada con los sentimientos de otros. Dese permiso a sentir todas las emociones que vengan, cuando vengan.
  • Celebre sus éxitos.
  • Trate de acudir a un grupo de apoyo con otras personas que hayan vivido lo mismo y puedan darle consejos, fuerza y ánimo.
Si tiene cáncer de seno, ¡sepa que no está sola! Conéctese con otras mujeres jóvenes como usted al enviarnos un correo electrónico a support@hereforthegirls.org
Here for the Girls (H4TG), o Aquí para las chicas, es una organización sin fines de lucro 501(c)(3) que mejora la calidad de vida de mujeres jóvenes afectadas por cáncer de seno (diagnosticadas antes de los 51 años). Ofrecemos apoyo social-emocional a través de servicios que aportan conexiones personales y una experiencia compartida entre sus miembros. Nuestro modelo de apoyo basado en investigaciones se concentra en el bienestar de nuestros miembros, y distribuye nuestros servicios a través de un método comunitario, no clínico. El resultado de este modelo es una comunidad robusta e inclusiva fundamentada en equidad y humildad cultural para crear un sentido de pertenencia y empoderamiento en todas las etapas: desde el diagnóstico, hasta el tratamiento, y aún más allá.

Todo eso está disponible libre de costo para la comunidad que servimos.

LO QUE CREEMOS

Here for the Girls valora sobre todo "EL AMOR" y se compromete a fomentar una cultura que celebre a todos sin importar la etnicidad, la raza, el color de la piel, las habilidades personales, la religión, el nivel socioeconómico, la cultura, o la orientación sexual. Promovemos los derechos humanos de todos a través del respeto mutuo, sin ningún prejuicio.

¿Tiene cáncer de seno?

apoyo social-emocional | educación | recursos | actividades
hereforthegirls.org o contáctenos a support@hereforthegirls.org
"Las mujeres jóvenes tienen tantos retos diversos, como carreras y (muchas veces) responsabilidades familiares. El tener un grupo de apoyo les puede ayudar a navegar sus emociones, compartir sus experiencias al hacerse preguntas, y hasta reír". - miembro de H4TG
Envíenos un correo electrónico a info@hereforthegirls.org
para recibir una copia completa de Una guía para cuidarse por correo.
META: Mejorar las vidas de mujeres jóvenes afectadas por el cáncer de seno
© 2022 Here for the Girls, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) public charity
EIN 26-0606190
1309 Jamestown Rd. Suite 204
Williamsburg, VA 23185
Contact us at info@hereforthegirls.org
cross linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram